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Ryecroft Middle School making strides for dyslexic pupils

By UttoxeterPostandTimes.3522974.UttoxeterPostandTimes  |  Posted: March 16, 2014

14/03/14 Ryecroft Middle School - Ryecroft Middle School Rocester
Ryecroft Middle School,certificate for re-accreditation of Dyslexia Friendly.Staff members Lucy Smith,Kelly Fry,Katherine Hurdman

14/03/14 Ryecroft Middle School - Ryecroft Middle School Rocester Ryecroft Middle School,certificate for re-accreditation of Dyslexia Friendly.Staff members Lucy Smith,Kelly Fry,Katherine Hurdman

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A SCHOOL has outlined the importance of helping dyslexic pupils after gaining an offical accreditation.

Ryecroft Middle School has been given the county council Level One Dyslexia Friendly Quality Mark for its action to accommodate students living with the condition.

Teaching assistant Kelly Fry told the Advertiser how important it is to ensure dyslexic pupils are catered for.

She said: “We’re finding more and more pupils are coming here with dyslexia and other special needs.

“As well as struggling with things like reading and writing, they often feel self-conscious about their condition and it’s important for us to ensure they feel part of the school family.

“We’ve been aware of the positive work we’ve been doing to that end but it’s nice to get some official recognition for it.”

To achieve the award, the school had an audit from Ofsted about its current practice.

Staff have taken part in briefings and activities to ensure they have a full awareness of what dyslexia is and the challenges sufferers face.

The Rocester school has also developed a dyslexia-friendly action plan as it bids to gain full accreditation in the coming years.

Mrs Fry said: “People often don’t understand just how difficult it is for pupils with dyslexia.

“It’s not just academic either. It’s day-to-day things. Their brains have to work much harder than those of non-sufferers.

“When they’re given instructions, it can take a lot longer for them to fully understand what’s being asked of them.

“You have to break things down into smaller, simpler parts and that helps them feel a sense of accomplishment before moving on to the next task.

“We have a Year Seven pupil who, when he came to us in Year Five, was making basic errors like repeatedly getting their d’s and b’s the wrong way round.

“Now, after a few years with us, you just don’t see that anymore.”

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